Monday, March 3, 2014

The Weekly Wrap-Up: Painting With a Twist & Jeepers Peepers

Happy Monday!

I actually took the weekend off to do NO work, but plenty of FUN things! Saturday night, I went to a painting party with friends where they teach you how to paint a particular picture (you choose which one you want to paint). See my very lovely, very professional Van Gogh-inspired painting below: (If you wanna purchase it, make me an offer ;) )


A Starry Night In St. Pete

On Sunday, we ran errands, went to lunch, and then went to an art show in Tampa. Halle Jane loved looking at all the art pieces, people, and pets...but her favorite thing was the outside music! It was a wonderful, restful weekend, and I'm so thankful I promised my husband I would enjoy it instead of working!



So now that the weekend is over, it's back to the grind. Here's what we were up to in therapy last week!


We've been spending  a lot of time working on writing. Last week was FL Writes for the 4th graders, so we talked a lot about being specific, providing details, and painting a picture with our words. Jeepers Peepers by Super Duper is a wonderful game for any kind of therapy...we used it in EVERY group I had last week!  (every group that was not inclusion)

Here's my Jeepers Peepers selfie!



Many of my students had never played the game before. So before we played the game, we chose a card and talked about how to describe something. We talked about categories and how the first thing you should identify (or try to figure out in the game) is the item's category. Then we talked about breaking the item down into a smaller category if possible. I showed the students how if they leave out important information, it not only makes it harder for someone to know what you're talking about, but they could actually think you're talking about something else altogether. (For instance, if you say: It's an animal that lives on the farm and has four legs, it could be a horse, cow, pig, sheep, etc. But if you say: It's a farm animal that has four legs, likes the mud, and says "oink," it can only be one thing!

Here's how we used the game for each of my groups:

Younger Kids Language Group: We took the cards and practiced placing items into categories. We also chose cards in the same category and practiced explaining why they belong together.

Older Kids Language Group: We practiced describing cards; Played the game by practicing yes/no and 'wh' questions; and compared and contrasted two different cards.

Word-Level Speech Group: We found picture cards with our sounds in them and practiced saying them; for those that could, they put the word cards into sentences.

Sentence/Conversation-Level Speech Group: We played the game normally, and I tallied their speech sounds at the sentence/conversation level. If they made an error and did not self-correct, they lost their next turn to ask a question. If they did self-correct, they kept their next turn.

Fluency Group: We played the game normally, and they practiced smooth speech while I tallied their dyfluencies. If they had a dysfluency but self-corrected, they we able to keep their turn. If they had a dysfluency but did not self-correct, they lost their next turn to ask a question.

Social Group: We played the game normally and practiced skills such as turn taking, asking questions politely, responding politely, using good eye-contact, addressing the conversational partner appropriately, wining and losing appropriately, etc. (depending on the age/ability levels.)

It was a wonderful week in therapy, and a very easy planning week for me!

Hope you all have a great week. I'd love to hear what you all are up to in therapy!


 

1 comment:

  1. I like the way you showed how you can take 1 activity and modify it for all of your groups!
    I've started a weekly roundup linky and would LOVE for you to help jump-start it! I figured it would be better to have all of our posts in one place; it would definitely make it much easier for readers!
    http://oldschoolspeech.blogspot.com/2014/03/week-in-review.html

    ReplyDelete